How do distance doctoral students learn about and access conferences? (James Burford)

In this post, Conference Inference Co-Editor James Burford considers the experiences of distance doctoral students in accessing conference opportunities and introduces a new survey he and colleagues have launched on distance doctoral education.

Photo by Mikey Harris on Unsplash
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Zoom Lunches and Tiffin Feasts: Inclusivity, Community and the Conference Dinner (Jyothsna Latha Belliappa)

In this post Jyothsna Belliappa considers why conference organisers might experiment with conference meals to enhance inclusive community building.

Image by: bandita, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0, via Wikimedia Commons
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Gender, Definitional Politics and ‘Live’ Knowledge Production: Contesting Concepts at Conferences

This post announces the paperback release of the book ‘Gender, Definitional Politics and ‘Live’ Knowledge Production: Contesting Concepts at Conferences’ and discusses how other researchers responded to the book at an online symposium.

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‘Confer-ring’ at contemplative studies conferences: Conference ethnography in a time of COVID-19 (Mareike Smolka)

In this post Mareike Smolka reflects back over a series of online conferences during 2020, arguing that digital environments offer opportunities for deepening connections.

Figure 1: Keynote speaker Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche at Mind & Life European Summer Research Institute (ESRI) 2020, ©Michael Fuchs.
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Post-Volcano Musings: Re-visiting the disruptive eruption of volcano Eyjafjallajökull in the light of COVID-19 (Ole B. Jensen)

In this post, Ole B. Jensen ponders on the capacity of disruptive events such as pandemics and natural disasters to re-think our understanding of social orders – including conferences.

@YoshGinsu
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Conferencing “disabled style” (Nicole Brown)

In this post Nicole Brown discusses how conferences exclude disabled and chronically ill academics, thereby disadvantaging them in career prospects. 

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Conferences, hospitality and the academic body (Josef Ploner)

While Covid-19 may have halted academic travel and gatherings and requires to ‘host’ conferences virtually, Josef Ploner reflects on the merits and limits of conference hospitality and how it caters for both the material and epistemic dimensions of the academic body.

SRHE Xmas decor
Celtic Manor Hotel – SRHE Conference, Wales (E. Henderson)

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Inhabiting New Territory: The Comforting Discomfort of Conference Aloneness (Shauna Pomerantz)

In this post Shauna Pomerantz explores conference aloneness as a keynote speaker in Trondheim, Norway, which was fruitfully experienced on multiple levels

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Conference or recruitment fair? China’s new hybrid academic events (Xuemeng Cao)

In this post, Xuemeng Cao reflects on conferences held by Chinese universities which combine research dissemination, recruitment and networking.

Outside the main hall of the venue (Xuemeng Cao)
Outside the main hall of the venue (Xuemeng Cao)

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