Guest post by James McCrostie: Don’t fall prey to a predatory conference

James McCrostie addresses the phenomenon of ‘predatory conferences’ – and how to spot one when it emails us.

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Continue reading “Guest post by James McCrostie: Don’t fall prey to a predatory conference”

Conferences and Caring Responsibilities – Individual Delegates, Multiple Lives

Emily Henderson introduces her new funded research project, ‘In Two Places at Once: The Impact of Caring Responsibilities on Academics’ Conference Participation’

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Sex and the academic conference

Academic conferences involve the coordinated movement (and coordinated stillness) of bodies across various kinds of spaces. Talking about the academic body and the research conference probably conjures images of a brightly lit room, and professionally dressed colleagues engaged in more or less erudite discussion. But, writes James Burford, what happens when the lights go out and the clothes come off?

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Conference tables: Reorienting Sara Ahmed’s ‘Queer Phenomenology’ towards embodied knowledge production

Taking inspiration from Sara Ahmed’s work on queer phenomenology, Emily Henderson considers the role of tables at conferences

In her book Queer Phenomenology (QP), Sara Ahmed refers to the English-language idiom of ‘being treated like furniture’ to make the point that furniture is often positioned in the background of human interaction. To be ‘like furniture’ is to blend into the unnoticed, taken-for-granted objects that, according to a Ahmed’s phenomenological approach, in fact scaffold our lives. Continue reading “Conference tables: Reorienting Sara Ahmed’s ‘Queer Phenomenology’ towards embodied knowledge production”

Guest Post by Mark Readman: ‘How to be a superstar scholar’ revisited

Mark Readman revisits his recent Times Higher Education article on acting selfishly at conferences.

mr-ualRecently I had an article published in the Times Higher Education in which I criticised what I felt to be egregious conference behaviour. Continue reading “Guest Post by Mark Readman: ‘How to be a superstar scholar’ revisited”

Guest Post by Nicholas Rowe: If your poster attracts little attention… it may not be your fault

Poster sessions at conferences are a popular and efficient form of dissemination, but Nicholas Rowe shows that the odds are against your poster being noticed.

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